Ten Daily Habits That Make a Good Writer (redux)

I may have been talking to myself as much as anyone when I compiled “10 Habits That Make a Good Writer” that first appeared in the original edition of A Writer’s Book of Days. Flannery O’Connor calls it “the writing habit,” others call it a daily practice, like meditation, like yoga. We know a regular practice, done with intention, can have a powerful effect on our well being.

Here’s a short-list of the “10 Habits”
1. Eat Healthfully
2. Be Physical
3. Laugh Out Loud
4. Read
5. Cross-Fertilize
6. Practice Spirituality
7. Pay Attention
8. Give Back
9. Connect With Another Writer
10. Write

Writers, like other artists and creatives, are easily seduced by our work. The creative process really can cast a spell. We forget to eat, forget to sleep, forget to move our bodies; we isolate, become self-centered (the work is everything). I think we forget we’re merely human—physical beings in a physical world, fragile and susceptible to all manner of ills, of the body as well as the spirit.

Balance. That’s what the “10 Habits” mean to me. Taking care of our bodies, not taking ourselves so seriously, filling the well that we empty by doing our work, participating in the world we live in. Our creativity is a gift, whether it’s writing, visual art, dance, music, cooking a delicious meal, crafting a beautiful vase, building a cabinet, decorating a room—all these creative gifts are meant to be shared. Give back to the world and the world will gain in ways we may never know.

Writers need one another’s support because creating our particular art is a solitary act and who can better appreciate that than another writer. Who can better understand the particular rigors, joys and disappointments of writing than another writer? Who better to help puzzle out a problem or to know what kind of celebration is called for when a poem is finished or a story or a book, especially when the writer herself is pleased with the work?

And that last “habit,” number 10: “Write.” This is what I find many who want to write don’t do—write every day. Even if only for ten or fifteen minutes. Give it half an hour; who knows what can happen. If we don’t write every day (or at least five days a week), we lose touch with our writing muscles, our imagination goes a little brittle, words hide out. The worst part about not writing, especially when we intend to write but somehow just don’t get to it, we feel bad about ourselves; maybe a little guilty, maybe embarrassed or ashamed to admit to ourselves or others. When we feel bad about ourselves it’s more difficult to get the pen moving. So we may miss another day, and then the next. The more we don’t do it, the worse we feel and the harder it is to “just do it.” But, by simply putting pen to page every day, or fingers to keyboard, even if what we write is what Natalie Goldberg calls “the worst junk in America,” we keep the creative muscles limber and the self-esteem healthy. The more we write, the better we feel about ourselves not just as writers, but in other areas of our lives, and so the more we write and so it goes. Daily practice. No judgment.

Download the completer version of “Ten Habits That Make Good Writers” here: ten habits

Why I Love Writing Marathons

I’m doing it again. Hosting another Summer Writing Marathon. I can’t help myself. These gatherings have been a summer staple for two decades and I can’t imagine a summer going by without one anymore than I can imagine owning a car that isn’t a ragtop.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWriting Marathons are among my favorite ways to spend a day with other writers. We gather around a big table, or in a grassy park, or once, at the home of one of us where we roamed the property all day, responding to prompts and trailing rose blossoms into the stream (me, ever the romantic). We’ve marathoned at crowded cafes and in spacious art studios, and in the rooms at various writing centers. This summer, on Saturday, August 23, we’ll meet at Inspirations Gallery, at Liberty Station, an ex-Navy Training Center that has been transformed into an arts and culture center with beautiful grounds and creative mojo.

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Blog Posts, Deadlines & Laundry

Keeping current with a blog while coming into the home stretch on a book deadline is more challenging that I thought. So is keeping adequate groceries in the house. Two nights ago I had popcorn for dinner, last night a bowl of cereal, which I also had for breakfast this morning. I ate the last of the cheese at lunch today, and the only crackers left in the packet are the broken ones. Even that last apple in the fruit bowl was a bit soft and wrinkly. The coffee supply is running low too. That’s when it gets really scary.

I thought I might get out for supplies this evening after I closed down the computer, but I finally unbent my legs from their sitting position and walked a few blocks to my new local cafe (Influx at 30th & Upas) for an iced Americano then picked up a veggie burger to go at Veg N Out, across the street. I figured that counted for exercise for the day, too. Something else that’s gone by the wayside these last several weeks.

I’m also a skosh behind on the laundry. I wore the same yoga clothes from morning until night pretty much every day last week, except when I changed back into my pajamas. At least the laundry basket isn’t overflowing. And I figure if you just sleep on one side of the bed, then if you alternate sides after a week you don’t have to change the sheets? Are you on with that?

Why I’m confessing all this in a blog post I can’t say. Maybe I’m hoping for absolution for this unusual streak of slobbishness by the high gods of literature. Or at least  few murmurs of understanding from my fellow writers. Maybe an offer from someone to bring over a pizza.

The good news is that the deadline for the book is just a few weeks away. Then things will go back to normal—microwave-ready meals from Trader Joe’s and fresh blog posts every time I change the sheets.

Hope all is well with you.